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Current state legislation in Victoria bans dogs from all indoor spaces where food (or drink of any kind) is served or consumed.

 

According to the law, dogs create a hygiene risk in pubs, yet there has not been a single incident where human illness has been caused by consumption of food contaminated by pathogens originating from an infected dog. We believe dogs should be allowed in indoor as well as outdoor spaces, provided they are kept away from areas where food is prepared or stored and subject to the policy of the owner of the business.

 

Make sure you fill in your FULL ADDRESS as otherwise your vote won't count (e.g. 11 Example Street, 2000 Sydney)

 

Allow Pups in Pubs in Victoria

The Petition of certain citizens of the State of Victoria draws to the attention of the Legislative Council the following proposal: We propose an amendment to current laws excluding dogs from pubs, bars and cafes to give the owners of the venues the right to decide whether dogs are allowed into indoor areas.

Standard 3.2.2 - Food Safety Practices and General Requirements cl 24(1)(a) of the Food Standards Code (administered under the Food Act by Food Standards Australia New Zealand) provides that a food business must not permit a dog (other than an assistance dog) in areas in which food is ‘handled’. The ‘handling’ of food is defined to include ‘serving’.

The Food Standards Code was amended in 2013 to allow for dogs in outdoor areas. FSANZ prepared a proposal to amend clause 24 (Animal and pests) of Standard 3.2.2 to remove a restriction on the presence of companion dogs in outdoor dining areas operated by food businesses. Now under cl 24(3) a food business may permit a dog to be present in an outdoor dining area.

The legal definition of food includes drink. Hence, a pub where only drinks are served is still legally considered to be a food business.

Is there a health risk in having dogs in pubs?

A comprehensive risk assessment3 was prepared by Food Standards Australia New Zealand as a supporting document for the 2013 change in Commonwealth legislation that allowed dogs into outdoor dining areas.

Here are some extracts from this risk assessment:

Situations where human illness has been caused by consumption of food contaminated by pathogens originating from an infected dog are most likely rare and no reports have been identified in a literature scan…

Food hygiene and safety regulations in most jurisdictions include basic measures to restrict the movement of companion dogs in outdoor dining areas such that food prepared and/or served by food businesses would not come into direct contact with companion dogs or dog faeces. It is therefore considered that transmission of pathogens by companion dogs in outdoor dining areas to consumers … is unlikely.

The overall level of food safety risk arising from the presence of companion dogs in such settings is expected to be very low to negligible…

Adherence to good hygienic practices in food preparation and service, maintenance of cleanliness, and proper pest control by food businesses should contribute to the minimisation of any potential risk of foodborne transmission of pathogens potentially carried by companion dogs in outdoor dining areas…

Since dogs in outdoor dining areas pose almost no threat to food safety or health, it’s hard to see why simply being indoors would substantially increase the risk to humans from dogs’ presence. If anything, since dogs are house trained, the already negligible risk of contact with dog faeces would be lessened still further.

What’s the situation with dogs in pubs in the United Kingdom and Europe?

Australia is regarded as one of the strictest nations when it comes to accessibility for companion animals.

Dog-owners in many European countries are free to take their pets inside shops, cafes, restaurants and onto public transport.

Dogs are allowed in indoor dining areas in the UK. The only legal obligation on the owner is to make sure there is no risk of contamination and that all food preparation areas are up to specified hygiene standards.

The relevant UK national law (a European Commission regulation) states4:

4. Adequate procedures are to be in place to control pests. Adequate procedures are also to be in place to prevent domestic animals from having access to places where food is prepared, handled or stored (or, where the competent authority so permits in special cases, to prevent such access from resulting in contamination).

The law does not specify excluding animals from areas where food is ‘served’.

Food businesses are responsible to ensure their own food safety management procedures identify and control risks to food hygiene such as having adequate procedures in place to prevent domestic animals from having access to places where food is prepared, handled and, or stored. The Local Authority is the competent enforcement authority for food businesses and they should be satisfied that the food business has adequate controls in place to prevent the risk of contamination.

Whether or not to allow a pet dog into the public areas of a food business is a matter for the individual food business operator to decide. Some businesses may have a “no pets” policy; others may welcome well behaved dogs in public areas.

Local councils would typically advise food businesses that dogs may not be permitted to enter those parts of premises where food safety could be compromised, that is areas where food (including ingredients) is stored, handled, prepared, or cooked - ie those areas where a customer would not be expected to gain access to either.5

What’s the next step?

The petitioners therefore request that the Legislative Council would amend the legislation in Victoria to allow dogs in indoor as well as outdoor spaces, provided they are kept away from areas where food is prepared or stored and subject to the policy of the owner of the business.

The second step would be to propose another amendment to the Food Standards Code to extend the regulations to allow dogs in indoor spaces as well as outdoors, subject to the same provision.

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Urge your local MP to take action! Send them the following letter (or draft one with your own words) and ask if they will support the petition. Send us their feedback on hello@pupsy.com.au and we will start publishing YEAs and NAYs!

 

Letter to the MPs

 


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While we are waiting for the signatures to add up, let's find new dog friendly places to sniff 🙂